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15
Nov
2019

植入心脏监视器 阻止无声杀手 “行凶” (Using Insertable Cardiac Monitors to detect Atrial Fibrillation, a condition that is commonly referred to as a ‘silent killer’)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The Heart Rhythm and Stroke teams at National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS) and National University Hospital (NUH) conducted a multidisciplinary, four-year study to better detect Atrial Fibrillation (AF) using Insertable Cardiac Monitors (ICMs) in cryptogenic stroke patients.
 
The study found that ICMs are seven times more effective than traditional methods in detecting AF. Ng Teng Fong General Hospital will be introducing the use of ICMs to detect AF in cryptogenic stroke patients from December 2019.
 
National University Health System (NUHS) also embarked on its first-in-Asia pilot study of a nurse-led, integrated care clinic in the community for AF patients with multiple chronic conditions at Bukit Batok Polyclinic. The clinic helps such patients to monitor their blood pressure and sugar levels, and educates them on managing their weight, diet and lifestyle habits. It gives patients a one-stop location to visit to manage AF and other chronic conditions, reducing cost and time. Till date, the clinic has seen about 80 patients and will expand its operating hours to cope with increased load.

Media ArticlesNUH in the NewsNUHCS in the NewsNTFGH in the NewsNUP in the News
12
Nov
2019

为健康解码的保健飨宴 (Health decoding forum)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Professor Tan Huay Cheem (Director, NUHCS) was reported to have shared expert advice and debunked myths surrounding heart health, at the ZB lohas health forum that took place on 9 November.

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7
Nov
2019

Health Check Podcast: Why women need to watch out for heart disease

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Dr Low Ting Ting (Consultant, Department of Cardiology, NUHCS) talked about why women need to watch out for cardiovascular disease – it is the top killer of women with a mortality rate of 1 in 3 women. In 2017, CV disease accounted for some 2700 women deaths, 8 times more than breast cancer deaths. Dr Low pointed out that while early CV disease is preventable, the risk of CV disease remains very much underappreciated. She urged women to modify their risk factors and take active steps to protect their heart health.  

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29
Oct
2019

心梗合并心源性休克:致命性并发症 (Myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock: Fatal complications)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director, NUHCS, contributed a piece talking about Myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock, its complications and treatment.

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22
Oct
2019

Tiny device detects heart problems, alerts doc immediately

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The Heart Rhythm and Stroke teams at National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS) and National University Hospital (NUH) conducted a multidisciplinary, four-year study to better detect Atrial Fibrillation (AF) using Insertable Cardiac Monitors (ICMs) in cryptogenic stroke patients.
 
The study found that ICMs are seven times more effective than traditional methods in detecting AF. Ng Teng Fong General Hospital will be introducing the use of ICMs to detect AF in cryptogenic stroke patients from December 2019.
 
National University Health System (NUHS) also embarked on its first-in-Asia pilot study of a nurse-led, integrated care clinic in the community for AF patients with multiple chronic conditions at Bukit Batok Polyclinic. The clinic helps such patients to monitor their blood pressure and sugar levels, and educates them on managing their weight, diet and lifestyle habits. It gives patients a one-stop location to visit to manage AF and other chronic conditions, reducing cost and time. The clinic is expanding its operating hours to cope with increased load.


Media ArticlesNUH in the NewsNUHCS in the NewsNUHS in the NewsNTFGH in the NewsNUP in the News
8
Oct
2019

陈淮沁教授: 别轻信网上假医药讯息 (Professor Tan Huay Cheem: Beware of fake medical news online)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Professor Tan Huay Cheem (Director, National University Heart Centre, Singapore) cautioned readers about the danger of referring to ‘medical information’ and myths from unofficial sources online, and advised on the importance of consulting a doctor for health concerns and complying with medication prescribed. This article, published ahead of Zaobao Lohas Mega Health Seminar, shared that Professor Tan will be sharing more about this topic at the event.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the News
26
Aug
2019

When your heart fails, you will not walk alone

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Dr Lin Weiqin, Consultant, Department of Cardiology, National University Heart Centre, Singapore, contributed an article about managing heart failure. Pointing out it is a growing epidemic, he noted that it is one of the most common causes of hospital admissions in Singapore and added that there is no single test to allow doctors to make the diagnosis of heart failure in insolation. He referenced a patient with severe heart failure who is managing his condition with medical therapy and the help of a multi-disciplinary heart failure team.

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22
Aug
2019

急性心脏病发作·死亡人数10年减两成(Number of fatal heart attack cases reduced by 20 per cent in 10 years)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​According to the Singapore Myocardial Infarction Registry Annual Report 2017 released by the National Registry of Diseases Office, the number of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) episodes increased by more than 60 per cent from 7,246 episodes in 2008 to 11,877 episodes in 2017. With advancements in emergency care, the number of deaths has fallen by 20 per cent over the same period, from 1,242 in 2008 to 1,004 in 2017. Professor Tan Huay Cheem, Director, National University Heart Centre, Singapore said the decrease in mortality rate was due to improvement in treatment and hospitals’ procedures which helped to reduce consultation time.

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11
Aug
2019

Exercises suitable for patients with chronic diseases

联合晚报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Dr Wang Mingchang, Associate Consultant, Division of Sports Medicine & Surgery, NUH, and Dr Yeo Tee Joo, Consultant, Cardiac Department, National University Heart Centre, Singapore, provided comment on the kind of exercises suitable for those with chronic diseases. Dr Wang noted that regardless of the type of chronic diseases (one has), patients are encouraged to do aerobic exercise, strength training and stretching exercises. Dr Yeo pointed out that if they have heart problems, they must first check with their doctors before exercising. The tests that the doctors may arrange include electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiogram, and exercise testing. Dr Yeo also shared that people who do not exercise regularly or have not exercised in a long time, should start with low-intensity workouts.

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8
Jul
2019

Heart Truths

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Prof Tan Huay Cheem Director, NUHCS, a key contributor of “The Healthy Hearts, Healthy Ageing Asia Pacific Report” commented on the findings and provided tips for cardiovascular health.  

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28
Jun
2019

Focus on preventive care to improve heart health: Report

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

An article on how Asia-Pacific countries should move away from an acute care model to a preventive one in order to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular diseases.
 
Professor Tan Huay Cheem, Director, NUHCS, said that governments across the world have important roles to play in cardiovascular disease prevention. He also said the first step is to provide evidence-based, cost-effective care. Second step is to put in place legislative measures and finally, government should work towards improving the general economic health of the population.  

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22
Jun
2019

Choosing the right test for heart disease

The Business Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

A contributed article by Professor Tan Huay Cheem, Director, NUHCS, and Professor Terrance Chua, Medical Director, NHCS, on how to choose the right test for heart disease.
 
While there are many tests for heart disease, each does have its own strengths and limitations while different tests are also recommended for different situations. Ultimately, choosing a test should depend on whether it can lead to better recovery outcomes.

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17
Jun
2019

Switch to healthier fats

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Professor Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre, Singapore commented on the cardiovascular risks of regularly consuming fried foods (which contain trans fats) and saturated fats like palm oil. Notwithstanding the data, he qualified that a person’s cardiovascular risk is ultimately dependent on multiple factors, with diet being one aspect. Pointing out that people may not realise they are consuming far larger amounts of saturated fats and trans fat than the recommended daily allowances, he mentioned that heart patients (in particular) should be consuming less trans and saturated fats. ​

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11
Jun
2019

Cholesterol-lowering drug cuts heart attack, stroke risks: Study

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

A large-scale international clinical trial has found that alirocumab, a cholesterol-lowering drug sold here, is effective in reducing heart attack and stroke risk. The trial involved about 19,000 patients from 58 countries including Singapore, who had experienced a heart attack or unstable angina that required hospitalisation. Though the drug was approved by the Health Science Authority in 2017, Associate Professor Poh Kian Keong from the National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS) remarked that the take-up rate has been low alluding it to two reasons – (1) effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality had not been determined and (2) expensive cost of drug.

Mr Koh Chye Choon, 65, a patient of the NUHCS suffered a heart attack in February this year. He was diagnosed with severe dyslipidaemia and coronary artery disease. Mr Koh could not be on statins therapy due to his intolerance to statins.  He was referred to A/Prof Poh Kian Keong who prescribed him alicumorab to reduce his LDL-C levels and cholesterol. Over six weeks, his blood cholesterol fell from 190mg/dL to 70mg/dL. 

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