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14
Jun
2021

Doc on Eriksen, who had cardiac arrest: He was gone, we got him back

The New Paper © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The New Paper mentioned a tweet posted by Asst Prof Yeo Tee Joo, Director of Cardiac Rehabilitation, Department of Cardiology, NUHCS, which stated that early recognition, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and defibrillation “saves lives regardless of aetiology of cardiac arrest”. He added that these are extremely important knowledge and skill that all should have.

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12
Jun
2021

施打第二剂 4 年轻男子现心脏炎症 (Four young men had heart inflammation after receiving their second dose of COVID-19 vaccine)

新明日报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

In an interview with Shin Min Daily News,Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre Singapore and Chairman, Singapore Heart Foundation shared that myocarditis is a common condition with asymptomatic symptoms and they are generally related to viral infections. 

Prof Tan explained that further studies and investigations are ongoing and current available data suggests that most cases are mild. Patients recover without the need for significant intervention and do not suffer any long-term effects.

He said symptoms of myocarditis usually appear on the same or next day after vaccination, but it is very rare.  He suggested to drink plenty of water, get sufficient rest and to wait three to four days before resuming any strenuous physical activity even if the individual does not experience any symptoms. He urged the public to seek medical attention should they experience chest pain for up to two hours after the vaccination.

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11
Jun
2021

抗疫重中之重 解读冠病疫苗 (Top priority in the pandemic fight – understanding COVID-19 vaccines)

Others

Commentary by Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Senior Consultant, NUHCS outlined how the COVID-19 virus affects the body, the types of vaccines available and how they work. Prof Tan said that the best way to fight against this pandemic is to go for vaccination as our body will produce antibodies to fight off the virus when infected. Prof Tan also discussed the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccines, possible side effects, and how people with heart disease can still go for vaccination.

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7
Jun
2021

Getting cold feet? It could be an early sign of heart disease

The New Paper © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Dr Dharmaraj Rajesh Babu, Senior Consultant, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, National University Heart Centre Singapore, commented that peripheral artery disease (PAD) is increasingly prevalent in Singapore today because of the ageing population. People who smoke and/or have other risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and cholesterol are at most risk of developing PAD. He emphasised the importance of recognising PAD’s warning symptoms, such as cold feet, to prevent escalation into heart disease or stroke, and that prevention is better than cure. Dr Rajesh advised patients with PAD to stay active and encourage the public to screen for chronic diseases at the appropriate age.

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26
May
2021

健康娜件事 - 冠心病与冠病19 (Cardiovascular heart disease and COVID-19)

Others

​In an interview with 96.3好FM, Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS), commented the best way to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic is to go for vaccination as our body will produce antibodies to fight off the virus when infected.  He shared how the virus may affect the body, the types of vaccines available and how they work. Prof Tan elaborated on the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccines, possible side effects, and how people with heart disease can still go for vaccination. 

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25
May
2021

抗疫重中之重 解读冠病疫苗 (Top priority in the pandemic fight – understanding COVID-19 vaccines)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Commentary by Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS), outlined how the COVID-19 virus affects the body, the types of vaccines available and how they work. Prof Tan said that the best way to fight against this pandemic is to go for vaccination as our body will produce antibodies to fight off the virus when infected. Prof Tan also discussed the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccines, possible side effects, and how people with heart disease can still go for vaccination.

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19
May
2021

走进陈淮沁的书房 (A walk in Tan Huay Cheem’s study)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Zaobao Online "On their bookshelves" video series featured Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS), who shared about his reading habit. Prof Tan mentioned that despite his busy schedule, he has cultivated a habit of reading three newspapers every day, which allows him to better understand and engage his patients.  He has also been a regular contributor of medicine-related commentaries to Zaobao for 16 years. 

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18
May
2021

对阿司匹林过敏的心脏病人 (A heart disease patient who is allergic to aspirin)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Commentary by A/Prof Ronald Lee, Senior Consultant, Department of Cardiology, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS), highlighted his experience treating a patient suffering from acute myocardial infarction who is also allergic to aspirin. A/Prof Lee noted that for a patient undergoing coronary intervention, allergy to aspirin is a piece of bad news as after the intervention, the patient will need to take two types of blood-thinning drugs for up to a year.

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5
May
2021

CNA938 - Health Matters

Channel NewsAsia

In the CNA938 interview, A/Prof Theo Kofidis, Head and Senior Consultant, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS) and Department of Surgery, NUS Medicine shared more about his new book, titled “Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery – A Practical Guide”, which covers a myriad of complex surgery techniques, latest knowhow and skills for practicing cardiologists, heart surgeons, perfusionists and nurses. He said the publication is done in a novel educational platform that unfolds interactively, using QR codes for the first time in printed surgical education. Readers can scan the QR code as they read each paragraph within the book and they will be transferred to a collection of essential audio-visual material, where readers can access and see how heart surgery procedures are performed.

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28
Apr
2021

科学家:聚维酮碘基消毒剂可降低感染新冠病毒的风险 (Scientists: Povidone-iodine based disinfectant can reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission)

Others

China Daily reported on the study findings highlighting that researchers from National University Health System have found that using povidone-iodine throat spray or the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine can reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection in healthy individuals in areas with high transmission rates.  The findings were published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, following a randomised clinical trial conducted among 3,037 migrant workers quarantined at Tuas South Dormitory in May last year. 

The study was led by A/Prof Raymond Seet, Senior Consultant, Division of Neurology, National University Hospital and clinician-scientists from National University Health System, including Prof Paul Tambyah, A/Prof Mikael Hartman, A/Prof Alex Cook, Dr Amy Quek and others.

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28
Apr
2021

New MICS book introduces novel educational concept for cardiac surgery

Others

BioSpectrum Asia featured the new book by A/Prof Theo Kofidis, Head and Senior Consultant, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, National University Heart Centre Singapore, which introduces a novel educational concept for cardiac surgery. 

Report quoted A/Prof Kofidis who said: “As a teaching resource, reference book and manual written by surgeons who both operate and teach the procedures described within, this book is a culmination, and indeed the crown jewel, of many years of dedication to minimally invasive heart procedures. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is an integral component of every future cardiac surgeon’s training, and we hope that the book will be an invaluable guide as it covers the latest research, trends and innovations in the field.”

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26
Apr
2021

Anti-malaria drug, throat spray found to cut Covid-19 infection risk

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The Straits Times highlighted that using povidone-iodine throat spray or the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine has been found to reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection in healthy individuals in areas with high transmission rates.  The findings were published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, following a randomised clinical trial conducted among 3,037 migrant workers quarantined at Tuas South Dormitory in May last year. 


The study was led by A/Prof Raymond Seet, Senior Consultant, Division of Neurology, National University Hospital and clinician-scientists from National University Health System, including Prof Paul Tambyah, A/Prof Mikael Hartman, A/Prof Alex Cook, Dr Amy Quek and others.

A/Prof Seet said that repurposing accessible existing drugs such as povidone-iodine and hydroxcloroquine is a practical way to curb the spread of the virus, especially in regions where Covid-19 is rampant.  He added that he, Dr Quek and A/Prof Hartman were early volunteers in the dormitories, where they ran medical posts and screened residents. He noted that the number of dorm infections was overwhelming at the start of the outbreak.  That was when they got together with Prof Tambyah and A/Prof Cook to come up with the idea of running a study, all with the overarching aim to help ease the burden on the healthcare system.  

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23
Apr
2021

New Book Offers Innovative Approach to Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery and Introduces a New Educational Concept

National University Heart Centre, Singapore

NUHCS Media ReleaseNUHS Media Release
7
Apr
2021

高剂量他汀或导致副作用 (High doses of statins may cause side effects)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Commentary by Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Director and Senior Consultant, National University Heart Centre Singapore, elaborated on cholesterol-lowering medicine – statins. He commented that high doses of statins may cause serious side effects and clinical experience also suggests that the Asian population is less tolerant of high-intensity statins than the European population. He also highlighted that the use of lipid-regulating drugs should be accompanied by diet control and lifestyle improvement.

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31
Mar
2021

Hao 963FM: Peripheral Artery Disease and Coronary Artery Disease

Others

​Hao 963FM conducted a radio and Facebook Live interview with Dr Peter Chang, Consultant and Clinical Lead, Vascular Medicine, Department of Cardiology, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS), who elaborated on the difference between Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Coronary Artery Disease CAD (CAD).  He shared on the risk factors of patients at high risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and major adverse limb events, as well as new treatment options. 

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